Transportation

EXISTING CONDITIONS AND CONCERNS
As shown in Fig xx the major arterial roads in the Hamlet of Bridgehampton are Montauk Highway, for east-west traffic, Bridgehampton Sag Harbor Turnpike for north-south traffic and Scuttlehole Road, which in addition to serving Sag Harbor, acts as a form of bypass for Montauk Highway.. Major collectors are Lumber Lane, Ocean Road, Sagaponack Road, Halsey Lane. Butter Lane and Mitchell Lane.

Traffic conditions in the Hamlet are dominated by Montauk Highway, which because of the very heavy east-west traffic is totally unsuitable as the Main Street of the Hamlet The road according to Dunn Engineering has a maximum capacity of 1200 vehicles per hour and in the summer of August 1999 the daily total was 30,869. Using the historical NY DOT annual rate of increase of 2 percent, in 2008 the total would have been 36,8913 or 1537 vehicles per hour, or a 50% overload.

The high volume of traffic along Montauk Highway makes left turn movements on to, and off, Montauk Highway, subject to long delays which in turn slow the overall traffic flow. Pedestrian crossings are only provided at the Post Office, the Candy Kitchen, the Presbyterian Church, the Library and the Sag Turnpike intersection. However the very heavy nature of the traffic makes for very prudent use of these crossings and does not encourage full development of the retail potential of the Hamlet Center. On street parking furthermore acts to slow traffic flow.While slowing the traffic constitutes a safely advantage, it militates against the practicality of Montauk Highway as an effective arterial.

At the time the Land Committee of the Town Transportation Task Force put forward a plan for adding an extra east bound lane for County Road 39, the Bridgehampton and Watermill CACs accepted this proposal on the understanding that steps would be taken to ensure that there would be no resulting increase in traffic on Montauk Highway, possibly by building a bypass on the LIRR right of way In 2008 the extra east bound lane on County Road 39 was added, which, since no by pass has been built, will lead to a further overload on Montauk Highway traffic through Bridgehampton.

With the present environmental concerns over facilitating more traffic flow, the resolution of this problem with the provision of a bypass has to be considered in the light of what other alternatives may be available.. The bus rail scheme for the East End is being analysed by the Volpe Center as one possibility,but it remains to be seen what their recommendations will be. In particular if such a system should be considered feasible, would it make any significant impact on traffic on Montauk Highway. Meanwhile the use of ad hoc bypasses either to the north or south of Montauk Highway continues to grow to the dissatisfaction of the residential areas through which these bypasses flow.

EXISTING CONDITIONS AND CONCERNS
As shown in Fig xx the major arterial roads in the Hamlet of Bridgehampton are Montauk Highway, for east-west traffic, Bridgehampton Sag Harbor Turnpike for north-south traffic and Scuttlehole Road, which in addition to serving Sag Harbor, acts as a form of bypass for Montauk Highway. Major collectors are Lumber Lane, Ocean Road, Sagaponack Road, Halsey Lane, Butter Lane and Mitchell Lane

Traffic conditions in the Hamlet are dominated by Montauk Highway, which because of the very heavy east-west traffic is totally unsuitable as the Main Street of the Hamlet The road according to Dunn Engineering has a maximum capacity of 1200 vehicles per hour and in the summer of August 1999 the daily total was 30,869. Using the historical NY DOT annual rate of increase of 2 percent, in 2008 the total would have been 36,8913 or 1537 vehicles per hour, or a 50% overload.

The high volume of traffic along Montauk Highway makes left turn movements on to, and off, Montauk Highway, subject to long delays which in turn slow the overall traffic flow. Pedestrian crossings are only provided at the Post Office, the Candy Kitchen, the Presbyterian Church, the Library and the Sag Turnpike intersection. However the very heavy nature of the traffic makes for very prudent use of these crossings and does not encourage full development of the retail potential of the Hamlet Center. On street parking furthermore acts to slow traffic flow.While slowing the traffic constitutes a safety advantage, it militates against the practicality of Montauk Highway as an effective arterial.

At the time the Land Committee of the Town Transportation Task Force put forward a plan for adding an extra east bound lane for County Road 39, the Bridgehampton and Watermill CACs accepted this proposal on the understanding that steps would be taken to ensure that there would be no resulting increase in traffic on Montauk Highway, possibly by building a bypass on the LIRR right of way In 2008 the extra east bound lane on County Road 39 was added, which, since no by pass has been built, will lead to a further overload on Montauk Highway traffic through Bridgehampton.

With the present environmental concerns over facilitating more traffic flow, the resolution of this problem with the provision of a bypass has to be considered in the light of what other alternatives may be available. The bus rail scheme for the East End is being analysed by the Volpe Center as one possibility,but it remains to be seen what their recommendations will be. In particular if such a system should be considered feasible, would it make any significant impact on traffic on Montauk Highway. Meanwhile the use of ad hoc bypasses either to the north or south of Montauk Highway continues to grow to the dissatisfaction of the residential areas through which these bypasses flow.

Accident statistics are provided in Appendix xx, but it should be noted that the intersection of Montauk Highway and Ocean Road and Sag Harbor Turnpike is a high accident location. Over a 15 month period there were 16 crashes while the adjacent intersection with Lumber Lane had 9 crashes.
Inevitably due to the attraction which Bridgehampton presents as a retail center in both Hampton Commons and on Main Street, there is a large demand for parking. At present there are a total of almost 800 public parking spaces available in the Center and some 1700 in the vicinity of the Commons and the Bridgehampton National Bank, which are detailed in Appendix YYY. For much of the year this is more than adequate but in the summer months there are times with a shortage of parking spaces.
Public transportation in Bridgehampton is limited. The Long Island Railroad (LIRR) provides rail service (relatively slow and infrequent) via the Bridgehampton station located at the southern perimeter of the industrial district. In addition to the LIRR, Suffolk County operates two bus lines serving Bridgehampton with official stop on Montauk Highway at Hampton Commons and no stop at the station. The S 92 operates between East Hampton Riverhead and Orient Point with a 1 hour interval and the 10B operates between Bridgehampton Plaza East and East Hampton Springs with a 1.5 to 2 hour interval. In addition the Hampton Jitney provides hourly service between Bridgehampton and New York City.

Transportation Recommendations
Since Montauk Highway has the highest traffic volume, and is overloaded, it is recommended that priority be given to the following

A) For safety purposes, either the left hand turn lane be extended from
Watermill to Town Line Road, or segments of it be installed at each of the
following intersections:

at Mecox Road, Hayground Road, Newlight Lane and, by agreement with
Sagaponack Village at Poxabogue Golf facility

B) That left hand turn arrows be installed on the Montauk Highway light at
Halsey Lane

C) From Watermill East the speed should be 40 mph to Hampton Commons, then SOmph to the school, then 20 mph and then revert to 40 mph.

D) In view of the proposed development of the gas station at Snake Hollow
Road a ban on left hand turns out of Snake Hollow and Hildreth Lanes should be evaluated.

E) To improve pedestrian safety and reduce traffic conflicts and congestion,
parking along Montauk Highway on the opposite side of any farm/produce
stands should be prohibited.

F) For the resolution of inadequate parking in the summer, the following
should be noted: Both the Presbyterian Church and the Church of the Most Holy Rosary have ample parking space to their rear. The Presbyterian Church provides no restrictions while the Church of the Most Holy Rosary has notices saying “Thou shall not park here” Would it not be possible for each of these churches to allocate a number of places for public parking, only for use during the week. Regrettably St Ann’s only has 7 parking spaces, which are often in use during the week but there is a total prohibition of parking on Hull Lane except on Sundays. Some relaxation of this during the week would be helpful. Eventually the Rogers’ House will have parking, some of which will be available to the public.

G) Consideration should be given to cross connecting the parking lots at
Newman Village with the Post Office, and, if they will agree, the Church of
the Most Holy Rosary.In addition public sharing of private parking facilities
should be encouraged.

H) All of the above should be evaluated as a means of dealing with a shortage of parking spaces in the Center, before turning to metered parking which will destroy the pleasure of visiting Bridgehampton.

I) Bridgehampton has two publicly accessible beaches, Ocean Road and Cameron Beach. The latter has parking but the former lacks organized parking of a nature which is appropriate to its significant popularity, and this needs to be addressed. One partial solution is the provision of town buses from the Bridgehampton School.

J) The suggestions contained in the 2004 Hamlet Study for a median down Main Street and a Roundabout at the intersection with Ocean Road and Sag Turnpike should not be pursued until traffic studies have been done which will enable the community to determine that such proposals are beneficial, (k) Bicycle and Pedestrian Circulation Copy original
Public Transit.

In view of the current Volpe Center Study which is underway, and which should be completed within the next few months, it is not appropriate to make recommendations at this time..

Comments (2)

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  1. Comment by Ian — January 31, 2010 @ 6:23 pm

    BRIDGEHAMPTON CENTER PUBLIC PARKING

    LOCATION RESTRICTIONS 3AM-5AM APPROX SPACES
    Community House Community House only no 39
    Behind Konner no 42
    Behind Konner yes with permit 24
    Behind Konner 3 hour max no 18
    School Street 3 hour max no 18
    Opposite Library 3 hour max no 24
    Prudential None ? 86
    South side Main St 2 hour max 8am-6pm no 44
    Thayers Public 3 hour max no 68
    Thayers Private ? 20
    N Main to Corwith 2 hour max 8am-6pm 69
    Corwith East side 3 hour max 85
    Corwith West Side 3 hour max 104
    Corwith-Post Office 3hour max 16
    Post Office 22 Newman none 100
    APPROXIMATE TOTAL 779

    BRIDGEHAMPTON BANK, OCEAN COPIES AND COMMONS PARKING

    Ocean Copies none 12
    Bank none 77
    Commons East ? 497
    Commons West ? 1143
    APPROXIMATE TOTAL 1729

    RAILWAY STATION
    North side of lot 30 minute max 49
    South side of lot Long term with permit 14 day winter 7 day summer 38
    South side of lot 18 hour max 10
    APPROXIMATE TOTAL 97

    BRIDGEHAMPTON APPROXIMATE TOTAL 2605

  2. Comment by Ian — January 31, 2010 @ 6:54 pm

    Concerning recommendation C the spped limit to the school should be 30mph.
    Concerning existing conditions the Volpe Center completed its study and recommended a bus only system for the North Fork and a combination bus/rail system for the South Fork. The rail portion of this was estimated to cost between 72 and 102 million dollars and Volpe pointed out that this was not aimed at reducing road congestion, but if it did it would be a welcome side effect. Since then the Town Transportation Commission has opened an enquiry to the possibility of simply improving the existing rail service. However most recently the MTA for budgetary reasons is proposing to largely eliminate rail service to the North Fork and to reduce service on the Montauk line.There is therefore little prospect of road congestion on the South Fork being reduced in the foreseeable future by improved public transit, and no move is afoot to further explore the joint rail road use of the LIRR right of way

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